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20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
the first class under the wisconsin workforce partnership program. diane stepp joined the program because she was unemployed, after being laid off, and was looking for a new career. diane has already been hired by amerequip corporation in new holstein as a cnc operator, and she started work yesterday. diane is here with us tonight. we also worked with the university of wisconsin system on a new flexible degree program called uw flexoption to help targeted fields. nearly a quarter of all adults in this state have some college credit without a degree. for many, time and money are the barriers to finishing that degree. i can relate. during my senior year at marquette university, i was offered a full-time job at the american red cross. i thought i would squeeze in a course here or there and finish things off in a year or two, but then tonette and i got married. then we had matt. and then came alex. next thing you know, you're putting all your extra time and money into your kids. the uw flexoption will provide a less time-consuming, less costly way to finish off a degree. it will help prepare
that they can once again see a better tomorrow for their children. my wife diane and i raised our three children, and we could not be more proud of the young adults they have become. our nest is now empty, but i can tell you i understand the pressures that all parents are under in the tough times they are going through. parents working, saving for college, paying for braces, helping with homework. shoveling from one afterschool -- shuttling from one afterschool activity to the next. that is why we worry so much. where can you afford a home in the best neighborhood so your kids will have the right school ? which health care plan can you afford so you can see your doctors? will your children make it through the nights of homework and graduate from school and if so get into a college and then are you going to be able to afford it? what about careers? these are all real-life concerns. this is what keeps parents awake at night fearful that life isn't going to work out the way they hoped. during the last several years, with the stagnant economy, too many mothers and fathers have had to come home and w
interrogation techniques. the targeted killing program and the use of drones. diane feinstein gavels in the hearing after an interruption from protesters. >> i ask that this room be cleared right now with the capitol police -- will the capitol police please come in and clear a room? -- clear the room? all signs out. if the capitol police will clear a room, please. [indiscernible] >> please clear the room. please clear the room. all right. we should clear the entire room and let people back in. >> we need more capitol police is what we need. will trylet's -- we and start. [gavel] >> begin this hearing and let me say right up front that the process is that people are respectful, that they cannot tear, they do not hiss, they do not show signs. this is to listen. if that is a problem for anybody ask you to leave the room now. because what we will do is remove you from the room. let there be no doubt. so if i may, i would like to begin. the committee meets today in open session to consider the nomination of john brennan to be the 21st director of the central intelligence agency and the fi
something else. and diane told a story of her grandmother after the bannick war of 1878. as a preteen she was marched all the way to boise and then another 300 miles to a reservation in yacama, from which she escaped with another young woman, together they swam the columbia river, and traveled over 300 miles back to berth. it was there they began to rebuild their tribe with no land and no resources. diane said when she looks out and sees other tribes that are better off than theirs, she is not envyous. she remembers her grandmother, and she thinks, look how far we have come. there is a lesson here for us and for our state. it was a really long, hard path in january 2011 to hear, and a long difficult road stretches out before us. so when we leave this place this morning, let's commit ourselves to partnership and to a shared vision so that when we reassemble two years from now in this chamber, we can once again say, look how far we've come. thank you very much. [applause] [applause] >> on the next "washington journal," we will preview the state of the union address. then we will focus on lo
are rarely used in crimes. 11,000 people are killed by firearms, and even diane feinstein says there are 32 killed with assault weapons. a standard semi-automatic rifle with certain cosmetic appearances. if it has a pistol grip, which means you can hold the gun underneath it. a collapsing stock. in order to shoot an ar, they adjusted to fit me. it is just like every other gone, there are a lot of misconceptions because of the language being used that there is no functional difference in any of the guns anyone is talking about. host: where did you grow up? did you grow up with firearms? guest: i lived in baltimore and my father had a handgun and a carry permit. but it was not discussed with his daughters. i found it one day when i was looking under his carseat. i saw the revolver under there. newly knowing this gun world, i suggest people keep it locked up. and also a teacher people about the gun and said, this is a weapon of self-defense. i suggest teaching the basics. the first thing you are drilled is to keep your finger off of the trigger until you are ready to fire. keep it focused in a
by firearms, and even diane feinstein says there are 32 killed with assault weapons. a standard semi-automatic rifle with certain cosmetic appearances. if it has a pistol grip, which means you can hold the gun underneath it. a collapsing stock. in order to shoot an ar, they adjusted to fit me. it is just like every other gone, there are a lot of misconceptions because of the language being used that there is no functional difference in any of the guns anyone is talking about. host: where did you grow up? did you grow up with firearms? guest: i lived in baltimore and my father had a handgun and a carry permit. but it was not discussed with his daughters. i found it one day when i was looking under his carseat. i saw the revolver under there. newly knowing this gun world, i suggest people keep it locked up. and also a teacher people about the gun and said, this is a weapon of self-defense. i suggest teaching the basics. the first thing you are drilled is to keep your finger off of the trigger until you are ready to fire. keep it focused in a safe direction. i was a girl, and if i was a
feinstein, but not anybody else? until we literally bludgeoned them, diane and i, to include everybody. it is amazing. i pursue dianne feinstein's statement about staff. under the previous administration, when you have a briefing with the president or the vice president and the cia and others, you are not allowed to -- i can remember when pat roberts was the chairman and i was vice chairman, we were not allowed to talk to each other driving up and driving back. staff were allowed to do nothing. you are surrounded by people who work with you and fill you in. people who are experts. we are, too. they've got to be part of this. wende olc comes, it should come to them also. i strongly agree with the chairman's views on that. in the enhance interrogation techniques matter, a handful of former cia officials who were personally invested in defending the interrogation program, largely because their professional reputations depend , i think it does a great disservice to discuss this issue. you understand that this took six years to write, not just 6000 pages. perhaps longer. 30,000 footnotes. w
chambliss, dianne feinstein, but not anybody else? until we literally bludgeoned them, diane and i, to include everybody. it is amazing. i pursue dianne feinstein's statement about staff. under the previous administration, when you have a briefing with the president or the vice president and the cia and others, you are not allowed to -- i can remember when pat roberts was the chairman and i was vice chairman, we were not allowed to talk to each other driving up and driving back. staff were allowed to do nothing. you are surrounded by people who work with you and fill you in. people who are experts. we are, too. they've got to be part of this. when the olc comes, it should come to them also. i strongly agree with the chairman's views on that. in the enhance interrogation techniques matter, a handful of former cia officials who were personally invested in defending the interrogation program, largely because their professional reputations depend on it, i think it does a great disservice to discuss this issue. you understand that this took six years to write, not just 6000 pages. perha
a lot of substance to that job. elizabethr dian warren. going for, my only real solution is to elect really good people who can say at times, i worked for red state, read district member in 2010 and the health care bill was a loud, contentious, very politically difficult fight to have. -- red district. one of the proudest moments i've ever had was that member came to me and said "i cannot live with myself if i voted against this bill." whenever the political consequences, that bill passed and i think we will survive moving record. those are the people that we need in congress. i don't see much of another solution to it other than. >> i know the internet is not going away or the cable news. you can watch events happen lives, and the instant reaction to everything. you don't even have a chance to separate from the moment, because everybody is passing judgment on what is happening. i hear what you are saying. >> it lines up extremely well with the new data. the pew research center yesterday indicated 50% -- rather 56 percent of americans say that current members of congress are to blame
is a result of a bipartisan effort of congresswoman cathy mcmorris rodgers and congresswoman diane degette, both members of the energy and commerce committee. they've worked long and hard on this legislation. it has great promise for increased hydropower development across the nation. we're delighted to bring it tooth floor today. at this time, i would like to yield two minutes to the gentlelady from washington, cathy mcmorris rodgers. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for two minutes. ms. mcrorries -- mrs. mcmorris rodgers: i ride in support of h.r. 267 which i introduced with my good friend from colorado, representative diana degette. as we continue to advance an all-of-the-above energy strategy we must remember to include our nation's largest, cleanest, most affordable, reliable, and renewable energy source. hydropower. sustainable hydropower is part of a strong economy. the to the see the potential and benefits of hydropower, all you have to do is look at my home state of washington state. over 57% of our electricity comes from hydropower. it's clean and renewable.
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)